House Moving Tips

House Moving Tips

1

PUT EVERYTHING THAT CAN GO IN A BOX, IN A BOX

PUT EVERYTHING THAT CAN GO IN A BOX, IN A BOX

(aka ‘don’t scrimp on your packing materials’.)

Not only will this protect your things, but it will also save time, and therefore reduce the cost of your move. It takes twice as long to carry loose bits and bobs between your property and our van, and it’ll take ten times longer to secure them ready for transit. Paying for an extra ten boxes will cost substantially less than adding an extra hour onto the length of the move. If you are moving into storage, having everything boxed allows you stack higher, saving space and therefore money on your storage bill. We can’t stress enough how much of a false economy it is to scrimp on packing materials.

Click here for a quick guide of what kind of thing should go in which size box.

2

THE HEAVIER THE ITEM, THE SMALLER THE BOX

THE HEAVIER THE ITEM, THE SMALLER THE BOX

(BROADLY SPEAKING)

A small box full of books is a heavy box. A large box full of books is a back breaker, will take two men to carry and will very probably lead to a broken box. You’d be amazed how often people try to put all their possessions into the biggest box possible to save money on packing materials, without thinking of their backs.

Size permitting, use small boxes for heavy items and large ones for lighter things. If you need to put something heavy in a big box, think about surrounding it with lighter things.

3

USE GOOD QUALITY BOXES

USE GOOD QUALITY BOXES

We use only double-ply, also known as ‘double wall’ boxes for removals. These will keep their shape and protect your possessions more effectively, and if flat-packed and stored correctly after use, can be used for move after move. Just so long as you use the box as advised…

 4

 DON’T OVER PACK YOUR BOXES

DON’T OVER PACK YOUR BOXES

You can’t stack boxes on top of a bulging box. They’ll topple over. And you denitely can’t stack on top of an open box with things sticking out of the top. You’ll also harm your chances of being able to use them again (and again and again).

5

DON’T FOLD YOUR BOXES SHUT. USE STRONG TAPE

DON’T FOLD YOUR BOXES SHUT. USE STRONG TAPE

Closing boxes by folding them in on themselves is not a secure way to close a box and heavy items are likely to fall through and out the bottom. Much like an over packed, bulging box, you won’t be able to stack them. Fold opposite flaps to make a seam, and tape shut using strong parcel tape. You won’t need much and this will help the box keep its shape (…and nothing will fall out of the bottom).

6

SOFTER ITEMS

SOFTER ITEMS

Bedding, clothing and other soft items can go in suitcases, checkered laundry bags, or even thick bin bags. Suitcases shouldn’t be so heavy they can’t be lifted, and remember to not fill bags to bursting point. We all know those zips are a little flimsy!

7

START PACKING EARLY

START PACKING EARLY

If you’re busy, the move will probably creep up and surprise you. Try having a box made up and open in the kitchen or at the bottom of a bookcase, a week or two before the move, with some packing paper. Pack away a few plates or books while waiting for the kettle to boil. Just don’t forget to keep a mug out!

8

WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR FULL DRAWERS

Empty your drawers out into boxes wherever possible, or bags if they’re clothes. If you absolutely can’t, leave everything where it is, but DON’T tape the drawers shut! This might ruin the finish or leave sticky residue behind!

We can carry the full drawers out to the the van individually, and replace them in the chest for transport. We’ll then do the reverse at your new property.

9

USE OUR HANDY BOX LABELS. THEY’RE FREE AFTER ALL!

When we deliver packing materials to you before the move, you’ll get a pack of our ‘Room and Contents’ labels. When you’ve sealed a box, slap one on, write where you want it to go in your new house, and what’s inside the box.

You wouldn’t believe how much time you’ll save at the other end, which could help you save a bit of money.

What should I be putting in each box?

Here’s a quick guide to help you remember what things should be going in what box.

Small

Books, records, magazines, heavy crockery etc. These boxes are best for heavy things, as even when they’re full, one person can manage them.

Medium

Kitchenwares, store cupboard items, DVD’s, CD’s etc. You can put larger books that won’t fit in the small boxes (coffee table books, for example.), but don’t fill it up exclusively with these; mix and match!

Large

Larger household items, soft furnishings, bedding, towels, lamps and shades, small frames. These are NOT for books, a large box full of books will take two people to lift, and cost you more money in the long run, down to extra time needed to move them.